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The Fight & Flight Response ...




The "fight or flight" response is a physiological reaction that occurs in animals or a survival mechanism that is triggered when an animal perceives a threat, including dogs. The response is controlled by the sympathetic nervous system and is characterized by the release of adrenaline and other stress hormones. This release of hormones causes changes in the body that prepare the animal to either fight or flee from the perceived threat. These changes include increased heart rate, blood pressure, and muscle strength, as well as heightened senses and decreased digestion. The fight or flight response is a natural survival instinct that helps animals respond quickly and effectively to dangerous situations.


When the response is triggered, the animal is prepared to either fight or flee from the perceived threat. This is why it is also known as the "fight or flight" response. If the animal chooses to fight, it will have increased muscle strength and energy to defend itself. If the animal chooses to flee, it will have increased speed and agility to escape.

In dogs, the fight or flight response can be triggered by a variety of stimuli, including loud noises, unfamiliar people or animals, and certain sights or smells. The dog's breed, personality and past experiences also play a role in how they react to these stimuli. For example, a shy dog might have a more heightened flight response, while an aggressive dog might have a more heightened fight response.

It is important to note that in some cases, the fight or flight response can be overwhelming and can lead to inappropriate or dangerous behavior, such as biting or running away.


There are a few physical and behavioral signs that can indicate your dog is experiencing a fight or flight response. These signs can include:

  1. Increased heart rate and breathing: Your dog's heart may beat faster and their breathing may become more shallow or rapid.

  2. Dilated pupils: Your dog's pupils may become larger when they are experiencing a fight or flight response.

  3. Increased muscle tone: Your dog's muscles may become tenser and they may appear to be "on edge" or ready to act.

  4. Ears back: Your dog's ears may be pulled back against their head, indicating a heightened state of alertness.

  5. Cowering or fleeing: Your dog may try to hide or run away from the perceived threat.

  6. Aggression: Your dog may become more aggressive or defensive when they feel threatened.

  7. Yawning, lip-licking, or shaking: These are signs of anxiety or stress.

  8. Body language: Your dog's body language can also show if it is in a fight or flight mode, for example, tail tucked, head lowered, and avoiding eye contact.

It's also important to keep in mind that a dog's behavior can change depending on the situation, and it's not always easy to tell if they're experiencing a fight or flight response. In some cases, it might be helpful to consult with a professional trainer or behaviorist who can help you identify the specific signs of a fight or flight response in your dog.


Seven (7) things you can do to help manage your dog's fight or flight response:

  1. Socialization: Exposing your dog to a variety of people, animals, and environments from an early age can help them learn to cope with new and potentially stressful situations.

  2. Training: Teaching your dog basic obedience commands, such as sit, stay, and come, can give them a sense of security and help them feel more in control of their environment.

  3. Desensitization: Gradually exposing your dog to the things that trigger their fight or flight response in a controlled and safe environment can help them learn to cope with them better over time.

  4. Positive Reinforcement: Using positive reinforcement techniques, such as treats and praise, to reward your dog for calm behavior can help them associate good things with the things that used to trigger their fight or flight response.

  5. Medications: In some cases, medications may be necessary to help manage a dog's fight or flight response. Consult with your vet or a professional animal behaviorist to see if this is an appropriate course of action for your dog.

  6. Avoid triggering situations: try to avoid situations that your dog find stressful as much as possible, especially if they are not trained to deal with them.

  7. Provide a safe place: Create a safe place where your dog can retreat to when they feel stressed or scared. This can be a crate, a bed, or a quiet room where they can relax and feel secure.

It is important to remember that every dog is unique and may respond differently to different methods of management. It may take some trial and error to find the best approach for your dog.


And it's always good to consult with a professional trainer or behaviorist who can help you develop a tailored plan for managing your dog's fight or flight response.



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